Buy Uganda Collards Directly From Exporters & Suppliers - Best of 2020 Market Prices


We provide high-quality Uganda collards to the local and export market. We source our Uganda collard from family growers in the country.

With the collective name of ‘sukuma wiki,’ Uganda collards (Brassica oleracea, var. acephala) and kales are cousins that are near-indistinguishable only that the term collar greens are sometimes used interchangeably. Unlike their domed counterparts, the cabbage, these plants are tall and have outward-bound multiple leaves. These sprout from a single stalk that is also the stem, which then branches into many leaf-bearing stalks. Sometimes confused with kales, the leaves of the collard have a wider span than the former but all the same, they are lookalike vegetables.

Farmers from Uganda cultivate many varieties that range from RianaF1 to QueenF1 and SerenaF1. They are some of the easiest vegetables to grow because they require little more than organic soil with proper drainage to thrive.  Thus, they are always readily available either for subsistence or for sale.

Like the kales, collard greens are an undeniable source of vitamin C with a capacity for 58 percent of the daily value. They also provide calcium for strong teeth enamel at a level of 23 percent of the daily value. The vitamin B-6 content at 10 percent of the daily value offers the body a good metabolism rate and an ability to sharpen the brain function.  There is also a potassium concentration of 6 percent that maintains the intake of blood electrolytes. With a magnesium content of 6 percent of the daily needs, eating sukuma wiki gives one a lease into health. Besides, the most recent discoveries in 2015 in the UK placed kales and collards among the most nutritious at combating modern degenerative diseases.

We source our collards from many parts in Uganda including Mbarara, Masaka, Hoima and agricultural Kabale. All our family growers own little plots of land of less than two acres at a time. They cultivate the crop under natural conditions through the use of farmyard manure and little or no application of chemicals.

We harvest Uganda collards when they have attained their sixth or eighth week after planting. We then use pruners to cut the mature broad leaves together with their attaching stalks. We then keep the leaves in a cool, shaded basket before carting the entire harvest to the packing shed.

We similarly pack the bunched Uganda collards as kales in 20-pound bushel size crates. We also have a larger capacity crate of 25 pounds net weight. For the small crate, we stock 12 bunches while the larger one receives 24 bunches. We also protect the leafy greens from moisture loss by wrapping polyethylene films on top of the cartons and crates. As a final measure of pre-cooled shipping, we inject top-ice of 2.2 pounds for every 4 pounds of the produce. As an alternative, we may also include liquid ice.

We store collard greens in temperatures of between 0 and 2° Celsius. A crop grown in warm locations is also possible to store at the slightly high-temperature levels of 7° Celsius. We maintain this temperature range when conveying the produce via our special trucks to the airport in Entebbe.

Therefore, if you are keen to lay hands on a fresh supply of Uganda collards, you now have a reliable partner to count on. We source our plants from at least two primary locations, including Kabale and Gulu, which means the availability of the crop in large quantities. Besides, we keep the quality fresh by having only supplies from Global Good Agricultural Practices (GAP)-certified farms.  We also have a great pricing mechanism that keeps in mind your budget for all time. Make your order today!