Did you know that the end product of ready to fry chips, potato chips, accounted for 35.5 percent of all snack consumption levels in the world, starting the year 2005? In that historical year for chips, total income for providers totaled to around $16.5 billion dollars. That proves how the product is not just popular only in the West but across the globe. But then, you have not sampled the ready to fry chips from the East African country, Kenya, sourced in raw form from family growers.

The two main produce commonly used in the making of our Kenya ready-to-fry chips include:

Potatoes:

Perhaps one of the most ‘bastard’ crops worldwide, potatoes literally thrive anywhere habitable, with their 50,000 varieties. In fact, since its first appeared from the wild in the Agrarian times in Peru and Bolivia, 8 to 5 millennia BC, the crop, which requires a cool clime with sufficient moisture, has gone through various etymological stages. The Portuguese actually referred, during the Age of Discovery, to the sweet potato as the ‘real’ potato, leaving the potato we are referring to as a secondary growth! Now, facts may speak for the oversight as the potato is the main ingredient of ready to fry chips across the globe.

Corn:

Common for maize in Kenya, corn first thrived in Mexico courtesy of the Aztec Civilization 10 millennia BC. In fact, the new crop with its yellow enmeshed grains, had its own god known as Centeotl in the Maya vanguard of Central America. Since the Age of Discovery and the discovery of the New World by Christopher Columbus in late 1400s, maize has spread in eclectic climes across the globe including the white kernel cultivar, the consumable variety we use in African regions like Kenya.

Kenya ready to fry chips may pass as a snack to many, but the fact that in a country like Spain fresh chips are common in 99.6% of kitchens, explains a world of health difference they make! For instance, unlike fried chips, ready to fry chips contain extremely low amounts of trans fat, as actually there are no additives. The choice to add fat is actually the user’s who can modify the content, use salt sparingly and fry in any way they wish including dip frying. 90% of the water content in potatoes is retained (actually the only tropical crop compared to rice, cassava, sweet potato, sorghum, plantains and others, with above 79% dietary water content). The maize chips retain the highest energy levels of any crop. Thus, with both potato or corn varieties, you can walk head high with plenty of vitamin K (courtesy of water) and starch.

We recommend that soon as you lay hands on your bag load of Kenya ready to fry chips from Selina Wamucii, thaw them off the ice immediately and keep them fresh at room temperature for a full day to acclimatize them to normal temperatures. Then you can use your ladle and sauce pans to begin the dip frying process and enjoy! You can fry the fresh chips at temperatures up to 350 degrees Fahrenheit, and in the initial minute of frying, frequently agitate them with your lardle. This helps bring out the crisp golden color so many admire in their chips. You can’t do without that red chili, masala or salt? Go ahead, indulge in your guilty pleasure, the fry is yours!

So, if you have a dream to grab that snack of Kenya ready to fry chips to enjoy them while fresh, Selina Wamucii spares no effort in ensuring that you get it. Whether for the export market or the local market, Selina Wamucii will deliver. Please order!

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